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Browsing Reflections Archive

March 27, 2020

Mar 26, 2020

Daily Reflection for Friday, March 27, 2020

Peace and Blessings, Friends and Parishioners,

We encourage you to reflect on Friday’s readings at this link:
http://usccb.org/bible/readings/032720.cfm

If you prefer to use your own Bible, the readings are:
First Reading: Wisdom 2: 1A, 12-22
Responsorial: Psalm 34: 17-21 and 23
Gospel: John 7: 1-2, 10, 25-30 

Our reflection on Friday’s readings:

“With violence and torture let us put him to the test that we may have proof of his gentleness and try his patience.  Let us condemn him to a shameful death; for according to his own words, God will take care of him.”  Wisdom 2: 19-20.

The reading today from the Book of Wisdom is a great foretelling of Jesus.  With violence and torture Jesus, the greatest example ever of nonviolence, was executed.

Written in the century before Jesus lived, the author of Wisdom describes in verses preceding today’s reading, the world as seen by the author:  “let us have our fill of costly wines and perfumes…Let no meadow be free from our wantonness; everywhere let us leave tokens of our merriment…Let us oppress the righteous poor; let us neither spare the widow nor revere the aged…let our strength be our norm; for weakness proves itself useless.”  These words from Wisdom could also be describing today’s world---or at least our country. 

With an “eat, drink and be merry” attitude, looming climate change, growing inequality, reductions in social programs, false pride that “might makes right” and the financially and militarily strong will survive, these words from Wisdom ring close to home for many.

But, we are told about a different way and a different man.  “He opposes our actions, reproaches us for our transgressions…he professes to have a knowledge of God, and styles himself a child of the Lord….his life is not like that of others…and boasts that God is his Father.”

Wow.  And what happened to that Son of the Father?  Violence and torture were used to test him and ultimately execute him.  Even today, we want to test him.  We question if his words were true or could be interpreted a different way.  We question if he’s really the God of peace and nonviolence, even though everything he taught and lived was the way of peace. 

How did Jesus respond to the violence and torture?  Then and now He responds with love and forgiveness.

Thank you, Jesus. 

Peace and blessings,
Al Mytty

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